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  • Take a walk after dinner

    by Margery Gass | Jan 29, 2013
    If you had high triglycerides at your last cholesterol check, your doctor probably told you to increase your exercise. Triglycerides are the type of blood fat that stores unused calories in your fat cells, and too much contributes to atherosclerosis and heart disease. Exercise is one of the best ways to bring those levels down, but your doctor may not have told you when to do it.

    Now, a little study from Japan tells us that exercising after a meal may be best. On three different days, the 10 participants did one of the following: took brisk walks and did some resistance training before the meal, took brisk walks and did some resistance training after the meal, or just rested after the meal. Compared with just resting, exercising before the meal decreased triglyceride levels by 25%, but exercising after a meal brought down triglyceride levels 72%—nearly three times as much! So make your dessert a walk. Try a walk after lunch or make a date for dinner and a walk.
    Go comment!
  • Q & A: vulvovaginal itching

    by Margery Gass | Jan 10, 2013
    Q: What can I do about vulvovaginal itchiness and hives?

    A: Dryness and irritation of the vulva are commonly related to menopause and can usually be easily treated with estrogen cream. Vulvar itching, on the other hand, has many causes, many of which are unrelated to menopause. A physical examination is needed to determine the cause of vulvar itching. In the meanwhile, be sure to eliminate all soap on the vulva. Just use clean water to bathe. From what we know about hives, it is unlikely that they are caused by the menopause. You should check with a dermatologist about the hives if they are not disappearing.
  • What causes hot flashes?

    by Margery Gass | Jan 10, 2013
    Researchers have made new discoveries about how hot flashes happen:

    A group of brain cells called KNDy (“candy”) neurons are probably the control switch for hot flashes. KNDy neurons respond to estrogen. When estrogen gets too low, these brain cells make more of a brain chemical (neurotransmitter) that signals the body that it is too hot. The body then releases heat by opening blood vessels to the skin that cause flushing and sweating as a cooling method.

    Hot flash sufferers, take note: these insights will eventually help scientists create new and safer treatments for menopausal hot flashes. And that’s cool news.

    Go comment!
  • Does grapefruit juice interact with your medication?

    by Margery Gass | Dec 20, 2012
    Do you take hormone therapy, birth control pills, or one of the other 85 medications listed here? If so, you must be careful to avoid too much grapefruit and grapefruit juice because they can cause your body to absorb higher levels of your medication.

    Grapefruit contains natural chemicals that alter how the body processes certain medications, so that you can end up with much higher levels of a drug than intended. For some drugs, higher levels can lead to inadequate breathing and dangerous increases in heart rhythm. You can learn more about how grapefruit affects your medicines from the FDA.

    If you are taking any medications by mouth, check the list to see if you should avoid grapefruit. Be safe!

    Go comment!
  • Daily steps add up for your health

    by Margery Gass | Dec 10, 2012
    Moving 6,000 or more steps a day—no matter how—can add up to a healthier life for you. We already knew that exercise programs can cut the risk of diabetes, which is a risk for heart disease. But a new exercise study from Brazil published online in the NAMS medical journal Menopause shows that you don’t necessarily have to go out for sports. You can be active through your daily activities, such as work, chores, or leisure activities. As long as the women in this study took 6,000 or more daily steps, they were much less likely to be obese or have these other health risks than the inactive women. And it didn’t matter whether or not they were taking hormone therapy. For midlife women, the journey to fitness can start with 6,000 steps.
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  • Early menopause link to endocrine disrupting chemicals

    by Margery Gass | Nov 30, 2012
    New research links endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to an earlier menopause. EDCs are chemicals that can interfere with human hormones in the body. They include pesticides, plasticizers, and even natural chemicals found in plants.

    The research found that women exposed to two types of EDCs had an earlier menopause. Menopause was 2.5 years earlier with exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 2.3 years earlier with exposure to phthalates. PCBs were banned in 1979 but can still be found in older products. Phthalates are found in many products including cosmetics.

    Exactly how EDCs change the age of menopause is not known so further research is needed. These findings were weak but suggested a trend that deserves further study.

    EDC exposure can have other effects. EDC exposed women had elevated breast cancer risk in another study. Increased exposure to certain chemicals, such as phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA), led to thyroid irregularities in women in one study. These chemicals are found in common containers like plastic bottles. Women exposed to high levels of flame retardants have been found to have reduced fertility. Flame retardants are used in many products — foam cushions in couches, carpet padding, clothing, electronics, etc. They can accumulate in fatty tissues, salmon, butter, cheese, ground beef, household dust, and waste water treatment plant runoff.

    How can you reduce risk of exposure?

    • Educate yourself
    • Eat organic food
    • Avoid pesticide use
    • Know where the fish you eat comes from and check with your state and local government about contamination in those waters
    • Avoid heating food in plastic containers or storing fatty food in plastic containers or wrapping
    • Support research and education about EDCs
    Go comment!
  • Get positive about body image during menopause

    by Margery Gass | Nov 21, 2012
    Did you know that we publish articles about menopause with More Magazine every month? (Here's the full archive of our writing on menopause help and education on their website.) Our latest piece is about body image during menopause and it has just been posted online — just in time for Thanksgiving. To all of our readers, we thank you and wish you a healthy and happy holiday this week!

    Go comment!
  • Exercise Rx: 10 minutes, 3 times a day

    by Margery Gass | Nov 09, 2012
    A new exercise prescription makes it easier than ever to keep your blood pressure under control. And it works better, too, than trying to huff and puff for 30 minutes straight every day. A study of exercise and blood pressure from the Healthy Lifestyles Research Center at Arizona State University showed that walking briskly for 10 minutes 3 times a day was even more effective than one 30-minute session a day at controlling blood pressure. The study volunteers had “prehypertension,” that is higher than normal but not over the hypertension line—but it predisposes people to full-blown hypertension, which can put you at risk of strokes, heart disease, and more. The easy-to accomplish, 10-minute sessions sent the volunteers’ average daily blood pressures down and cut the number of blood pressure spikes above 140/90.

    See more on menopause and exercise in our online magazine Menopause Flashes.

    Go comment!

MenoPause Blog

We strive to bring you the most recent and interesting information about various aspect of menopause and midlife health. We accept no advertising for our website. We want you to have accurate, unbiased, evidence-based information. 

JoAnn V. Pinkerton, MD, NCMP
Executive Director


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