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Get a longer, healthier life when you quit smoking at menopause

by Margery Gass | Mar 13, 2013
Two recent reports in the New England Journal of Medicine brought bad news and good news about women and smoking at midlife and beyond. The bad news: women have nearly caught up with men in their risk of dying from smoking. Men and women smokers from midlife to their 70s have a risk of dying that is three times as high as women who never smoked. Long-term smoking cuts your life expectancy by a decade.

But here’s the good news: quitting before age 40 erases most of the risk of early death. The risk of stroke and heart disease drop quickly after you stop smoking. (The risk of cancers drops more slowly.) Even if you are older than 40, you can still gain back some years. Quitting by age 50 buys back about 6 years, and quitting by age 60 about 4 years of the decade you’d lose if you didn’t quit.

We know there’s good news about menopause and aging, too, if you quit. You may be able to delay the onset of menopause, since smokers reach menopause earlier, and quitting may also decrease your hot flashes. And if you quit, you will have fewer wrinkles, age spots, and less sagging than your smoking sisters the same age.



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Going Mad in Perimenopause? Signs and Solutions

Mood swings, short-term memory loss, and difficulty thinking straight are common complaints from midlife women. However, while many of these symptoms are attributed to menopause, there are other contributing factors to consider as well.

Hormones: During reproductive years, most women become accustomed to their own hormonal rhythm. When this rhythm is disrupted during perimenopause, mood changes may result.

Timing: The timing of menopause may coincide with a multitude of midlife stresses like relationship issues, divorce or widowhood, care of young children, struggles with adolescents, return of grown children to the home, being childless, concerns about aging parents and caregiving responsibilities, as well as career and education issues...

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Dear readers,

Twenty-five years ago, The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) was founded on the principle that women like you deserve the most scientifically accurate and up-to-date information. We are so proud to have provided the best in women’s health research and education to tens of thousands of women. Hopefully, we have helped you.

We have never asked for a donation, but providing this level of support is costly. I hope you will consider helping us in any way you can. Your contribution will allow us to continue the important work we do to make the lives of women healthier and better. A donation of $100 or more will get you a free copy of our Menopause Guidebook


Tara Allmen, MD, NCMP
President 
The North American Menopause Society Foundation

 
 The Menopause Guidebook
Available in Print, Kindle, and iBook editions.

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